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How to Pick the

Right Sound Bar

‘Sound bar’ refers to an enclosed speaker, especially designed to be placed underneath your TV, or in front of it. In case your TV is mounted on the wall, you can get a sound bar which is mountable. Usually, mounting kits are provided with sound bars that are mountable. Also, almost every major TV manufacturer and audio company offers them nowadays. Although sound bars are called ‘bars’, they can arrive in a number of different types, shapes and sizes. On the cheaper end, sound bars can be purchased for as low as $100, and can go up to several thousand dollars on the other end. Price difference is mainly determined by the number of features offered. Real surround, faux surround, digital input, analog input, HDMI input, USB port, subwoofer, and Bluetooth support are some of the popular features. Sound bars are not exactly very simple speakers, and so, picking the right kind is not really a straightforward job. This guide will help you understand which sound bars will serve you right.

What Are Your Requirements?

If looks matter a lot to you, even more than the sound quality you get, be sure to pick a bar manufactured by your TV brand. Samsung has a sound bar called the HW-H7500/ZA, for instance, which complements the wide range of curved Samsung TVs. But, if you take this route, remember that TV manufacturers almost never produce sound bars that offer great audio. You can go for a pedestal sound bar, too. ZvoxSoundbase, costing between $180 and $700, is a good example of the kind. Pedestal sound bars sit on your TV furniture, and do not disturb the view of your TV screen. Plus, as the volume of air tends to be higher inside a cabinet, lower frequencies end up sounding better with them! Said another way, pedestal speakers produce better bass, and as a result, do not force you to purchase a subwoofer. If the thought of owning a pedestal model excites you, make sure that you pick a model that has good width and sturdiness. Otherwise, your speaker will not be able to accommodate the TV stand and support the weight of your TV well.

The need for subwoofer

In case you want to purchase a conventional speaker, as opposed to a pedestal model, consider getting a variant that comes with an inbuilt, or additional, subwoofer. Sound bars that have no subwoofer contain very small speakers, and such speakers cannot reproduce low-frequency sound effects nicely. That means, if you go with a model that has no subwoofer, you will not be able to enjoy the shaky feels and the rumbles experienced in movie theaters. Although having a sound bar with subwoofer may force you to settle for something boxy or large, chances are that you will not regret your decision one bit. Besides, as low-frequency sound effects tend to be non- directional, you will have the freedom to keep your subwoofer hidden behind your furniture, or a plant. You will have to use AC cord to power your subwoofer, but other than that, you can expect it to connect to your sound bar wirelessly.

The Surround Sound Puzzle

Note that many sound bars sound like they provide surround effect. However, very often, what you hear is simulated surround. Cheap sound bars often make use of psychoacoustics to make you think that you are hearing real sound surround. While such faux surround may give an impression of spaciousness or depth, you cannot expect great quality output. Faux surround can never match up to true surround. If you want to know what faux surround means, open your Windows Media Player, then enable TruBass and SRS Wow.

What About Connectivity?

Many sound bars contain a number of different outputs and inputs, such as RCA, USB, HDMI and TOSLink. If you love connecting your set-top box, gaming console, and blu-ray simultaneously, for instance, you will need a model that offers multiple inputs of HDMI kind. If you own an old TV, or a stereo receiver, you may need inputs of RCA analog type. However, 1/8 inch stereo inputs work quite similarly. Also, RCA-to-1/8 cables tend to be inexpensive. While it is better to have a lot of inputs, paying for more inputs unnecessarily is not recommended. There is no reason to restrict your sound bar to enjoying just movie soundtracks. Using a sound bar for playing stereo is a good idea, too. Sonos models generally make use of own wireless network. However, most other speakers are able to rely on tablets and smartphones to obtain audio, using Bluetooth.

Sound Advice: Budget

TV soundbar sounds

like a terrific deal

Sound bars and home theater systejms add another dimension to TV viewing. Here’s some advice on how to pick the best sound bar for your needs. Q: You occasionally write about speakers that are designed to be companions to a TV and improve the sound. I think you call them soundbars or soundbases. My TV’s sound is really lacking. What can you recommend for me? A: These TV speakers come in many forms, from simple stereo soundbars to high-end soundbase systems with built- in powered subwoofers that fill the room with home theater surround sound. I’ve written about many makes and models over the years. More elaborate, high-end systems will be discussed in an upcoming column. This week I have a great find for anyone interested in dramatically improving their TV’s sound with a simple, affordable, high-value solution. Poor TV sound is the No. 1 subject of e-mails sent to the column, and I suspect this week’s find will be the answer for a lot of readers. The Insignia NS-SB314 soundbar (tinyurl.com/insigniasoundbar) is sold in Best Buy stores. The regular price is $99, but it is often on sale for $79. I bought one to test when I saw it on sale, and I was extremely pleased by the value it represents and the great job it does for the price. You connect the soundbar to the cable box, Blu-ray player and other source to the TV with HDMI cables. Then you run an optical digital audio cable from the TV to the soundbar. The TV will take the audio signal from your source and route it over the optical cable to the soundbar. You may need to turn off the TV’s speakers to activate the optical connection. If you need an optical cable I recommend the Bluerigger cables sold on Amazon for less than $10. The remote has controls for bass, volume, mute and input select. You cannot use your TV’s remote to set volume, an option provided by some more expensive products. But I found that I didn’t need to use the remote much. Once I had the soundboard set up the way I liked it, I could forget about it and enjoy it. For more information on sound bars click on the link below:
More Info From StarTribune.com More Info From StarTribune.com
Enim voluptate Ad anim ut deserunt minim anim aliquip labore dolore commodo

Sonos 3.1 Home Theater System

An expandable home theater setup that brings HiFi sound and all the music on earth to your TV PLAYBAR brings powerful, realistic sound to your TV with nine amplified speakers SUB brings deep, room-filling bass without any buzz Expand to 5.1 surround sound by adding a pair of PLAY:1 rear speakers (not inlcuded)
CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO Picture of sound bar

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eQuest Equestrian Supplies

How to Pick the

Right Sound Bar

‘Sound bar’ refers to an enclosed speaker, especially designed to be placed underneath your TV, or in front of it. In case your TV is mounted on the wall, you can get a sound bar which is mountable. Usually, mounting kits are provided with sound bars that are mountable. Also, almost every major TV manufacturer and audio company offers them nowadays. Although sound bars are called ‘bars’, they can arrive in a number of different types, shapes and sizes. On the cheaper end, sound bars can be purchased for as low as $100, and can go up to several thousand dollars on the other end. Price difference is mainly determined by the number of features offered. Real surround, faux surround, digital input, analog input, HDMI input, USB port, subwoofer, and Bluetooth support are some of the popular features. Sound bars are not exactly very simple speakers, and so, picking the right kind is not really a straightforward job. This guide will help you understand which sound bars will serve you right.

What Are Your Requirements?

If looks matter a lot to you, even more than the sound quality you get, be sure to pick a bar manufactured by your TV brand. Samsung has a sound bar called the HW-H7500/ZA, for instance, which complements the wide range of curved Samsung TVs. But, if you take this route, remember that TV manufacturers almost never produce sound bars that offer great audio. You can go for a pedestal sound bar, too. ZvoxSoundbase, costing between $180 and $700, is a good example of the kind. Pedestal sound bars sit on your TV furniture, and do not disturb the view of your TV screen. Plus, as the volume of air tends to be higher inside a cabinet, lower frequencies end up sounding better with them! Said another way, pedestal speakers produce better bass, and as a result, do not force you to purchase a subwoofer. If the thought of owning a pedestal model excites you, make sure that you pick a model that has good width and sturdiness. Otherwise, your speaker will not be able to accommodate the TV stand and support the weight of your TV well.

The need for subwoofer

In case you want to purchase a conventional speaker, as opposed to a pedestal model, consider getting a variant that comes with an inbuilt, or additional, subwoofer. Sound bars that have no subwoofer contain very small speakers, and such speakers cannot reproduce low-frequency sound effects nicely. That means, if you go with a model that has no subwoofer, you will not be able to enjoy the shaky feels and the rumbles experienced in movie theaters. Although having a sound bar with subwoofer may force you to settle for something boxy or large, chances are that you will not regret your decision one bit. Besides, as low-frequency sound effects tend to be non-directional, you will have the freedom to keep your subwoofer hidden behind your furniture, or a plant. You will have to use AC cord to power your subwoofer, but other than that, you can expect it to connect to your sound bar wirelessly.

The Surround Sound Puzzle

Note that many sound bars sound like they provide surround effect. However, very often, what you hear is simulated surround. Cheap sound bars often make use of psychoacoustics to make you think that you are hearing real sound surround. While such faux surround may give an impression of spaciousness or depth, you cannot expect great quality output. Faux surround can never match up to true surround. If you want to know what faux surround means, open your Windows Media Player, then enable TruBass and SRS Wow.

What About Connectivity?

Many sound bars contain a number of different outputs and inputs, such as RCA, USB, HDMI and TOSLink. If you love connecting your set-top box, gaming console, and blu-ray simultaneously, for instance, you will need a model that offers multiple inputs of HDMI kind. If you own an old TV, or a stereo receiver, you may need inputs of RCA analog type. However, 1/8 inch stereo inputs work quite similarly. Also, RCA-to-1/8 cables tend to be inexpensive. While it is better to have a lot of inputs, paying for more inputs unnecessarily is not recommended. There is no reason to restrict your sound bar to enjoying just movie soundtracks. Using a sound bar for playing stereo is a good idea, too. Sonos models generally make use of own wireless network. However, most other speakers are able to rely on tablets and smartphones to obtain audio, using Bluetooth.

Sound Advice: Budget TV

soundbar sounds like a

terrific deal

Sound bars and home theater systejms add another dimension to TV viewing. Here’s some advice on how to pick the best sound bar for your needs. Q: You occasionally write about speakers that are designed to be companions to a TV and improve the sound. I think you call them soundbars or soundbases. My TV’s sound is really lacking. What can you recommend for me? A: These TV speakers come in many forms, from simple stereo soundbars to high-end soundbase systems with built-in powered subwoofers that fill the room with home theater surround sound. I’ve written about many makes and models over the years. More elaborate, high-end systems will be discussed in an upcoming column. This week I have a great find for anyone interested in dramatically improving their TV’s sound with a simple, affordable, high-value solution. Poor TV sound is the No. 1 subject of e-mails sent to the column, and I suspect this week’s find will be the answer for a lot of readers. The Insignia NS-SB314 soundbar (tinyurl.com/insigniasoundbar) is sold in Best Buy stores. The regular price is $99, but it is often on sale for $79. I bought one to test when I saw it on sale, and I was extremely pleased by the value it represents and the great job it does for the price. You connect the soundbar to the cable box, Blu- ray player and other source to the TV with HDMI cables. Then you run an optical digital audio cable from the TV to the soundbar. The TV will take the audio signal from your source and route it over the optical cable to the soundbar. You may need to turn off the TV’s speakers to activate the optical connection. If you need an optical cable I recommend the Bluerigger cables sold on Amazon for less than $10. The remote has controls for bass, volume, mute and input select. You cannot use your TV’s remote to set volume, an option provided by some more expensive products. But I found that I didn’t need to use the remote much. Once I had the soundboard set up the way I liked it, I could forget about it and enjoy it. For more information on sound bars click on the link below:
More Info From StarTribune.com More Info From StarTribune.com
Enim voluptate Ad anim ut deserunt minim anim aliquip labore dolore commodo